Archive for August, 2017

What Are the Causes for the Recent U.S. Navy Collisions?

August 30, 2017

Maybe this article from the Navy Times has the answer – Maybe today’s Navy is just not good at driving ships. This is further supported by a series of three articles published in Proceedings Today: Collisions: Part I – What Are the Root Causes?; Collisions: Part II – Operational Pause; and Collisions: Part III – Maintenance.

Required reading is the oft-cited 2010 Report of the Fleet Review Panel on Surface Force Readiness as chaired by retired Vice Admiral Philip Balisle.

Another important document is this 2010 GAO report – Navy Needs to Reassess Its Metrics and Assumptions for Ship Crewing Requirements and Training as is this 2017 report – Navy Readiness: Actions Needed to Maintain Viable Surge Sealift and Combat Logistics Fleets. Other GAO investigations on the Navy can be found here.

Numerous Congressional hearings on fleet readiness are also available online.

One should peruse this 2017 CRS report – Defining Readiness: Background and Issues for Congress.

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Histories of the U.S. Marine Corps

August 30, 2017

This site contains numerous online publications ranging from general histories to unit histories to bibliographies, and finding aids. Whole sections are devoted to either individual conflicts or time periods. The occasional primary source, such as journals, do make an appearance.

“[U.S.] Marines in the Frigate Navy”

August 23, 2017

This series of fourteen 4-color prints show the life of the Marine Corps from 1798 to 1835. Each poster comes with a page explaining the historical significance of the event. Compare this to The Marines in the Revolution: A Pictorial History.

Commerce Raiding

August 18, 2017

There is surprisingly little written on this topic outside of selected monographs on certain ships. To partially remedy this lacuna in the historical record, Commerce Raiding: Historical Case Studies, 1755-2009 was published. As the introduction states: “As a military tactic, commerce raiding has time after time proved itself a most efficient way to exert pressure on an opponent. A few scholars have placed these events in their social, political, and naval contexts, but their studies have been the exception, not the rule. For this reason, this collection should fill a major gap in the academic literature.”(1) A select bibliography adds to the usefulness of this work.

 

U.S. Naval Strategies in the Late 1900s

August 16, 2017

Here are some relevant documents from the Newport Papers series:  U.S. Naval Strategy in the 1970s: Selected Documents; U.S. Naval Strategy in the 1980s: Selected Documents; and U.S. Naval Strategy in the 1990s: Selected Documents.